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Fire Safety Prevention and Preparation

Regardless of the industry or type of business you conduct at your work facility, fire safety should always be a main concern. Too often we get wrapped up in our work and do not take the conscious steps needed to prevent work fires. The best way to ensure the safety of your staff is through fire prevention and preparation. Talk with your staff about the following precautions they can take to be aware of their surroundings in the facility to prevent future fire emergencies.


Fire Prevention is a Hot Topic!

Fire safety is an important workplace topic throughout the year. While death and injury are the greatest risks and the ones with which most people are familiar, fires also destroy jobsites and offices. In fact, many workplaces destroyed by fire are never rebuilt because it is simply too expensive. Don’t let a fire threaten you, your co-workers and your job. Here are some general tips for a fire-safe workplace to share with your fellow employees.


Planning for a Fire in the Workplace is Key!

Nobody ever expects an emergency or disaster to occur in their workplace. Yet the basic truth is that emergencies can strike even in the least expected places, such as work. When it comes to workplace fires, the best way to protect yourself, your workers and your business is to develop a well-thought-out emergency action plan as a guide for when instant action is essential.


Fire Safety In the Workplace

While October is generally recognized as Fire Prevention Month, the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and most fire departments designate the second week of October as Fire Prevention Week.  This has roots dating date back to the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 that killed more than 250 people and left more than 100,000 homeless. The purpose of this focused effort is simple—fire safety is serious business.  It deserves a month long effort to underscore the importance of fire safety in the home, in schools and at work.  


Planning and Responding to Workplace Emergencies

September is Emergency Preparedness Month. Considering that many of us spend a good portion of each day at our jobs, being prepared at work is essential. In addition to its long list of regulations, the OSHA website has all types of information, resources and tools available to employers to help prepare for emergencies and keep employees safe, should an emergency or disasters strike. Obviously, preparedness is key, since no one can predict a fire, earthquake, explosion, etc., so employers must establish and implement effective safety and health management systems that will prepare their workers.


Emergency Preparedness: Building the Right 72 Hour Kit for Your Family

by Charles Peruffo, CSP 

September is national preparedness month.  In the event of a disaster you and your family may be required to survive on your own for up to 72 hours until help arrives.  Anyone who has ever tried to buy flashlight batteries as a storm approaches knows it can be a nightmare.  A small amount of preparation can save a lot of stress in an already stressful time.  We have compiled a list of supplies and equipment for a basic 72 hr kit.


Home Protection against Brushfires

by Will Wenrich

Most New Jersey residents only think of a forest fire as something that exists on TV. The reality is, New Jersey’s pine barren forests are one of the most fire prone environments. With all eyes on fire activity in the West and Alaska, New Jersey has still experienced 728 fires with 1484.5 acres burned as of August 23rd, 2015. It is important for homeowners to understand the risk despite the perceived danger.


Protect Yourself by Practicing Electrical Safety

Fundamentals of Electricity

  • There must be a completed path (circuit) stemming from and returning to the power source (battery, transformer) in order for electricity to flow.
  • Electrical current has the ability to flow through humans and other conductors, such as earth, metals and concrete.

  • Insulators are resistant the flow of electricity. Insulating materials are used to create electrical work gloves and are used to coat copper conducting wires. Insulators help shield individuals from coming into contact with flowing electricity.

  • Even when there is not electricity flowing through receptacle, there is still “potential” electricity in the receptor that can cause shock.